Why I Wrote The Prodigal Band Trilogy

Three years ago I wrote a set of posts titled The Prodigal Band Trilogy: The Why in five parts. If you scroll down most of the way on this Home Page or go to my blog and scroll through pages you will find these posts—but to make it easier to understand why I wrote these three novels, I am reprising these posts into one long post here, beginning with part one and ending with part five, plus an additional post reprise as well. Note: A few small changes were made from the original posts. Enjoy!

Part One

As I have said in previous posts both here and the blog site, I began my journey as a writer of fiction around the age of 8 or 9. I was returning home, on Long Island, New York, with my parents and older brother in a car from a visit to my grandparents (mother’s side) who lived in Mount Dora, Florida (about 20 miles from what was then Orlando). It was the summer of 1962; thus, I was 9 at the time. And I just happened to bring some non-lined notebook-sized paper and pencil with me. The paper was folded in half, width-wise, and looked like a “paperback book.”

Glad I brought the paper and pencil, because I was bored. I do not remember what my brother, in the back seat with me, was doing–he was 14 and likely listening to transistor radio up to near his ears (and folks, before the Beatles came along, pop music was very very boring, cutesy-wootsey “love songs” and other meaningless tripe about teenagers falling in love. From the time of the plane crash of Big Bopper, Ritchie Valens, and Buddy Holly in 1958 until the Beatles in 1964, “rock” music, if you could call it that, was IMHO, tripe. Dion and the Belmonts and Del Shannon and perhaps the Four Seasons were about as good as it got, and who the heck was Elvis? But anyway…) I had no idea what my parents were doing other than driving the car.

This was my first journey into the “deep south.” And the only thing I knew about the “deep south” related to the Civil War and the abominable institution known as slavery back then. There were times along Route 301 or even what was then I-95 when I would see what were called “negro shacks” along the way, plus we all visited some Civil War Confederacy monument somewhere, can’t remember. Now I was a “buff” so to speak of Civil War history. So I decided I was going to make up some story about this kid in the South during the Civil War who, along with his friend, a black kid who had been freed from slavery somehow and lived with the kid and his family, hated the south and slavery! So what he and his friend did was help the Union Army blow up a Confederate “ammunition dump.” And they did. I did not mention the state the kid lived in, or even the kid’s family name, but I called him “Johnny Reb” and the black kid was named Sammy. So, I named a kid who would blow up a Confederate ammo dump Johnny Reb? When my dad actually read the “book” (named “Johnny Reb” and was about 20 pages long in pencil) he brought up this irony! After all, weren’t the Confederates called “Rebels”?

Around that time I also had a diary–didn’t all young girls have diaries then? So, there I was in late 1963 just starting to have any interest in the watered-down “rock and roll” back then. When it rained outside, and in the Northeast US, home of “Nor’easters,” it almost always rained some in the fall and early winter, the public elementary school kept all the students in the gym after lunch, too wet to play outside. I was in sixth grade at the time and, not being popular so-to-speak, no boy wanted to dance with me. So all I did then was listen to whatever 45 RPM record discs were put onto the record player. Not being a ‘A-list’ or even ‘B-list’ (more like ‘D-list!’) that’s all I could do as most of my friends were dancing on the gym floor with boys whom had asked them to dance. Well, I had to try to ‘fit-in’ somehow so, even though I thought the music was boring tripe, I pretended to like it anyway. Thus, in my diary I would make up stuff about myself–in terms of a fiction character I can’t even remember the name–being popular and folks like Chubby Checker or Frankie Valli (spelling?) wanting to ‘dance’ with me (not knowing the actual hidden meaning of ‘dance’ at the time…’dance’ was code for a certain ‘f’ word if you know what I mean!) And of course I made up the boy characters as well. And named them the same names I have used for the original rock band characters in my books! (Note: the band concept came about in the latter 60s, and then I added two more band members, then deleted one of the originals in the 80s only to put him back in during the 90s). The reader is going to have to wait to find out the names of the characters for a bit.

Note: Here are the names of the band characters, including last names which I tend not to mention in my snippet posts: singer Erik Manning; guitarist-band leader Jack Lubin; bassist Keith Mullock; guitarist-producer Mick Pordengreau; keyboard synthist Bry McClellan; drummer Tom Cornsby. One of these days I will explain how I came up with the names.

Continue reading “Why I Wrote The Prodigal Band Trilogy”

Timeline Construction Within The Prodigal Band Trilogy

This post will not be a ‘snippet’ post, but a post about the creation of the three novels within The Prodigal Band Trilogy–the fact that this trilogy does not follow the usual timeline construct. Most trilogies have the first novel representing the beginning time period, and the time moves forward in line into the second novel and then ends the timeline within the third novel. This is how Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings trilogy, as well as The Hunger Games trilogy and the Divergent trilogy are fashioned—beginning, middle, end. And many others as well…and also series novels such as J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series. The Prodigal Band Trilogy certainly does not follow that scenario!

The first novel, Battle of the Band, begins (after the ‘before time’ spiritual part) in 1986 and ends in 1996. The second novel, The Prophesied Band, begins in 1982 and ends in 2000. The third novel, The Prodigal Band, begins in 1976 and ends in 2004. So that while each novel itself starts in an earlier year and ends in a later year, the time frame is not continuous from the first novel to the third novel.

Before I state why this is the case let me say that I didn’t exactly plan it this way. The second novel was supposed to take up where the first one left off. But the first one didn’t play out as originally planned either, and the first book wasn’t even supposed to spearhead a trilogy.

Then an inspiration came to me to subtitle Battle of the Band with this subheading: The Saga of the Prodigal Band Begins (as can be seen on the original book cover). In other words, the ‘Parable of the Prodigal Son’ within Luke 15 of the Biblical New Testament had to seal this burgeoning trilogy’s fate, as the first part of this parable is about how the son takes his inheritance, leaves his father, goes far off into another country and spends the fortune on ‘riotous living,’ leaving him financially and spiritually destitute. While the prodigal band isn’t financially ruined they are ‘destitute’ spiritually but discover there is a way out of this ‘poverty.’ So I had to re-do the novel with this theme in mind, which changed pretty much everything, including the time frame construction.

When beginning the second novel, The Prophesied Band (subtitled The Saga of the Prodigal Band Continues…implying this would be the second book in a likely trilogy), I had to construct a scenario whereby the band in question, Sound Unltd, would be ‘the prophesied band.’ So I began this novel (after a spiritual part in what would be the prologue in the original book) with a rock band from the same city, Walltown, as the prodigal band, and the narrator, pop culture pundit Jay Elliot seeking that particular career upon high school graduation in 1982, interviews the creator of the song—which was given to him by angels called the Tooters for the purpose of ‘announcing’ a future band of prophecy. The band of prophecy that would carry out a ‘mission of God’ as the novel ends at a trade and music festival headlined by this prodigal band.

Thus the timeframe of the first novel is wrapped within the time frame of the second novel: 1986 to 1996 falls between 1982 and 2000, correct? Further, for the final novel, it made sense to begin that one in a year prior to 1982 and end it in a latter year after 2000.

The final novel was originally going to be called ‘Band of Glory,’ as indicated on the back pages of The Prophesied Band, which was supposed to have the subheading The Saga of the Prodigal Band Concludes. But that was not to be. If it would be called ‘Band of Glory,’ it would have to end in Heaven with God, somehow. But again, inspiration had other ideas…for one thing, what would happen to the entity allied with evil, Corion? And would the band, carrying out the mission given to them, deserve to be in Heaven? Would they stick to the Plan, so to speak? And what events would cause them to choose to stick with this Plan?

The Parable of the Prodigal Son ends with the errant son returning home to his father, feasting on ‘fatted calf’ and being ‘found.’ His brother, of course, questions the sincerity and worthiness of his ‘lost’ brother—just like many Christians today question the efficacy of a wealthy rock star even coming close to accepting Christ a Savior (since they are all ‘devil worshipers,’ right?). Thus, not only did I have to author a novel as to how and why the prodigal band converted to belief on Christ and carried out their missions, but I also had to explain how and why the band was even formed in the first place, including parental and otherwise guidance: how and why were these six band members able to develop such talent and songwriting abilities in the first place? Since these boys grew up beginning in the late 70s, that is why the third novel begins in 1976, into 1980 and 1982 and 1985, with two new band members. Aspects of the first part of the parable and then the second part where the band discovers the way forward into the final ‘found’ part are focused in the first six chapters of this third novel. The ‘way home’ final part of the parable is the focus of the rest of the third novel.

So, thanks to inspiration and keeping to a script based on a biblical parable, this time frame construct of The Prodigal Band Trilogy doesn’t follow ‘the usual trilogy script.’

The next post here will take place in a couple of weeks. Next week’s focus will be on updating my blog with links to newer snippet posts here, since I have not updated the blog in months and this blog is an easy way to link to posts here without constant scrolling down the site to find them. Plus the main menu here also needs updating somewhat. Plus I need to figure out a new ‘snippet category’ to ‘snippet’ about! And more…

Cheers!

Snippets of The Prodigal Band Trilogy: Historical Context, Part Two—William of Normandy Invades Britain, and Genealogy

As with the Roman invasion of Britain under Emperor Claudius in 43 AD, the Norman invasion of Britain in 1066 AD has little context within The Prodigal Band Trilogy, except for one thing: a major spiritual character, Morwenna, aka ‘the witch of the Hovels,’ would not have had the influence she had on the prodigal band had this invasion not taken place, and had this invasion not been aided by an aristocratic family that somewhat aided the forces of William the Conqueror.

It is weird with aristocrats…throughout history, various aristocratic families have had a tendency to aid the enemies of their countrymen and that would include fellow aristocrats. But when power is to be had, aristocrats often turn against their fellows in order to gain power: Julius Caesar vs. Brutus; Tutors vs. Stuarts; the Hundred Years War between opposing yet related royal families of France and England; the Biblical split up of Israel into Israel vs. Judah, Spanish vs. Austrian Habsburgs, and many more. But the rivalry between Duke William of Normandy and England’s King Harold, as both are closely related, is somewhat complicated, which led to the Norman invasion aided by Norsemen and other English rival aristocrat families where timing was key. From the Wikipedia page on the Norman Conquest:

“The Norman Conquest (or the Conquest) was the 11th-century invasion and occupation of England by an army made up of Normans, Bretons, Flemish, and men from other French provinces, all led by the Duke of Normandy later styled William the Conqueror.

William’s claim to the English throne derived from his familial relationship with the childless Anglo-Saxon king Edward the Confessor, who may have encouraged William’s hopes for the throne. Edward died in January 1066 and was succeeded by his brother-in-law Harold Godwinson. The Norwegian king Harald Hardrada invaded northern England in September 1066 and was victorious at the Battle of Fulford, but Godwinson’s army defeated and killed Hardrada at the Battle of Stamford Bridge on 25 September. Within days, William landed in southern England. Harold marched south to oppose him, leaving a significant portion of his army in the north. Harold’s army confronted William’s invaders on 14 October at the Battle of Hastings; William’s force defeated Harold, who was killed in the engagement.”

So Vikings invaded northern England around the time Normans did? Hmmmm… Yet, if one has watched the History Channel TV series Vikings, it might make sense. It turns out William of Normandy is directly descended from Normandy’s first ruler, Rollo, a Viking (and brother to the TV show’s main character, Ragnar Lothbrok), who, after trying to conquer France in Paris, wound up marrying the Carolingian King Charles’s daughter (and supposedly converting to Christianity) and was given Normandy to rule over in 911 AD. (Note: the Carolingians are descended from Charlemagne, who took over France in 800 AD, crowned by the pope of that time.)

“In 911, the Carolingian French ruler Charles the Simple allowed a group of Vikings under their leader Rollo to settle in Normandy as part of the Treaty of Saint-Clair-sur-Epte. In exchange for the land, the Norsemen under Rollo were expected to provide protection along the coast against further Viking invaders. Their settlement proved successful, and the Vikings in the region became known as the “Northmen” from which “Normandy” and “Normans” are derived. The Normans quickly adopted the indigenous culture as they became assimilated by the French, renouncing paganism and converting to Christianity. They adopted the langue d’oïl of their new home and added features from their own Norse language, transforming it into the Norman language. They intermarried with the local population and used the territory granted to them as a base to extend the frontiers of the duchy westward, annexing territory including the Bessin, the Cotentin Peninsula and Avranches.”

So, is it possible these Viking invaders against King Harold invaded to aid in the cause of Rollo’s (I’m speculating here) great-great grandson, William? Hmmmm…. It was Rollo, then son William I, grandson Richard I, then sister of great-grandson Richard II (Edward the Confessor), then Harold, whom William considered illegitimate as he was promised the throne. And why does a Viking invasion have any context within the trilogy? For one thing, the mother of singer Erik is Norwegian—from what would turn out to be a family that had roots in the Norman invasion, as a snippet will tell later in this post.

Continue reading “Snippets of The Prodigal Band Trilogy: Historical Context, Part Two—William of Normandy Invades Britain, and Genealogy”

Snippets of The Prodigal Band Trilogy: Historical Context, Part One: Rome Invades Britain Under Emperor Claudius; Druids

According to this Wikipedia post on Rome’s conquest of Britain, the conquest began under Emperor Claudius in 43 AD. The historical context within The Prodigal Band Trilogy however isn’t really about conquering England or trying to conquer Scotland or keep the “Picts” as the Scots were called from trying to get rid of the Romans (one reason Hadrian’s Wall was built just north of the Tyne River, to keep out the “Picts”). The historical context is about conquering Wales, home to the fictitious Crag-Dweller sect of Celtic cannibals led by the pagan priest Crynnwagg in the fictitious “Craggy Mountains”. According to Wikipedia, when the Romans conquered Wales they had to put down the Druids as well. Unfortunately, Wikipedia does not have a post about Druids in Wales, but just Druids, a sect of priests that worshiped various pagan gods of the Celts, throughout Celtic areas including Scotland, Ireland, England, Breton (now part of France), Gaul (most of present-day France) and Cornwall, which has its own Cornish dialect.

The trilogy states the year 50 AD as the time when Rome invaded Wales, but that is not true, yet not far off either. According to the map on the Wikipedia page, the Romans entered Wales in 54 AD, and, by 96 AD, Wales was pretty much conquered completely. I chose the year 50 AD, not knowing exactly when Rome tried to invade Wales, because it’s a ‘round number’ so to speak—plus, there was a new Roman Emperor in 54 AD, Nero. And another thing—that fact that Rome conquered Wales and most of the rest of Britain really doesn’t play into the novels. Yet, the fact is (which I knew was fact for years) that the Druids did try to keep the Romans out of Britain (as they’d tried in Gaul and other places they inhabited, but under Julius Caesar in his time—Caesar did conquer Gaul and did visit Britain for a bit). Therefore, since the trilogy features the evil Crynnwagg as the high priest of the Crag Dwellers who lived in the ‘Craggy’ Mountains of Wales and fought Druids, and since Druids did try to keep out the Romans, it figured that the Roman invasion under Claudius needed to be referenced. From Wikipedia:

“…Late in 47 the new governor of Britain, Publius Ostorius Scapula, began a campaign against the tribes of modern-day Wales, and the Cheshire Gap. The Silures of southeast Wales caused considerable problems to Ostorius and fiercely defended the Welsh border country. Caratacus himself was defeated in the Battle of Caer Caradoc and fled to the Roman client tribe of the Brigantes who occupied the Pennines. Their queen Cartimandua was unable or unwilling to protect him however, given her own truce with the Romans, and handed him over to the invaders. Ostorius died and was replaced by Aulus Didius Gallus who brought the Welsh borders under control but did not move further north or west, probably because Claudius was keen to avoid what he considered a difficult and drawn-out war for little material gain in the mountainous terrain of upland Britain. When Nero became emperor in 54, he seems to have decided to continue the invasion and appointed Quintus Veranius as governor, a man experienced in dealing with the troublesome hill tribes of Anatolia. Veranius and his successor Gaius Suetonius Paulinus mounted a successful campaign across North Wales, famously killing many druids when he invaded the island of Anglesey in 60. Final occupation of Wales was postponed however when the rebellion of Boudica forced the Romans to return to the south east in 60 or 61.”

Most of Wales was conquered in the 70s AD, according to Wikipedia.

“…The new governor was Agricola, returning to Britain, and made famous through the highly laudatory biography of him written by his son-in-law, Tacitus. Arriving in mid-summer of 78, Agricola completed the conquest of Wales in defeating the Ordovices…He then invaded Anglesey, forcing the inhabitants to sue for peace.”

Further down scrolling indicates in red all of Wales was conquered up to around where Hadrian’s Wall would be located, in 96 AD. As for the Druids, from the Wikipedia page on Druids:

Continue reading “Snippets of The Prodigal Band Trilogy: Historical Context, Part One: Rome Invades Britain Under Emperor Claudius; Druids”

The Truth About the (Music) ‘Industry’ Expounded in The Prodigal Band Trilogy (Part Five)—If Dead Rock Stars Could Talk (Part Two)

In Part One is listed several rockers and others who ‘committed suicide’ (or were murdered, and there is plenty of evidence to back these claims as the victims tended toward exposing the evil agendas they discovered in the music industry), including the so-called ‘27 Club’ highlighted by Jimi Hendrix and Kurt Cobain, and more recently, Chris Cornell of Soundgarden and Chester Bennington of Linkin Park, within months of each other, for planning to aid children harmed by pedophilia and trafficking. And it is not a coincidence that right after Swedish DJ Avicii created and released a video, ‘For a Better Day,’ that exposed child trafficking rings, he was also ‘suicided’ by ‘hanging from a doorknob.’

The post began with the opening line of the third novel in The Prodigal Band Trilogy, The Prodigal Band: “If dead rock stars could talk.”

If these dead rock stars could talk, we would know a lot more about the evils being perpetrated by the rulers of the industry, and the world itself.

The notion of entertainers in and out of the music industry being ‘suicided’ or otherwise punished for resisting and exposing the evil in the industry really didn’t hit me until after the first two trilogy novels, Battle of the Band and The Prophesied Band, were published in the latter 90s. Right after The Prophesied Band was published, we got dial-up internet, which provided me with research material to help me finish the trilogy, but it took years of research (among other things which kept me busy and putting off the third novel for nearly 20 years) to realize that the idea of ‘if dead rock stars could talk’ needed to be placed front and center within the plot. Further, if the prodigal band realized they were being targeted by the elites for turning against the narrative, they would finally wake up to the surest way to ‘redeem’ themselves from the evil that would be unleashed upon them, given the choice to do so, or not.

Since I have already provided several snippets relating to the evil side carrying out plans of killing the band members that did not work out as they planned, the snippets posts here reveal the actual plots, not the outcomes.

Continue reading “The Truth About the (Music) ‘Industry’ Expounded in The Prodigal Band Trilogy (Part Five)—If Dead Rock Stars Could Talk (Part Two)”

The Truth About the (Music) ‘Industry’ Expounded in The Prodigal Band Trilogy (Part Five)—If Dead Rock Stars Could Talk (Part One)

In the opening line of The Prodigal Band is this statement: “If dead rock stars could talk.”

It was uttered by a man called ‘Trenchcoat’ who partook in the attempt to murder, or at least do great harm, to the members of the prodigal band Sound Unltd, and he speaks the above opening line in Chapter One of the third novel in the trilogy. ‘Trenchcoat’ works for a secret society of assassins called ‘the Dark Web’ that does the bidding of the evil satanic group the Hellyons and also the evil secret society of elitists called the Novordo Club.

But instead of posting The Prodigal Band Trilogy snippets for now, I am posting actual truth about the possible fates of those in the music industry that went against the narrative that serves the rulers of this industry, including record label owners, parent company owners, handlers, venue owners, etc. Because the prodigal band Sound Unltd did serve the owners and the evil, but did begin turning toward industry truth after various tribulations, repenting in the end. The snippets about this will appear in the next post next week.

For now, I will provide some examples of this truth that there is a price to pay for going against the narrative, using several links to researched articles, some with videos.

This post will offer evidence that a number of rock stars (and not just rock stars by the way…the murders of rappers Biggie Smalls aka Notorious B.I.G and Tupak Shakur are clearly of evil intent relating to rival record companies…check this out in the link to Vigilant Citizen below) died under suspicious circumstances that while are considered ‘suicides’ are more likely murders. This includes members of the notorious “27 Club” (Jimi Hendrix, Jim Morrison, and Kurt Cobain) as well as Stephen Hutchence, Chris Cornell, Chester Bennington, and Avicii, who was a DJ…they ‘suicided’ by hanging from doorknobs.

The rest of this post tells why the ‘suicides’ are more likely punishments for the rockers’ desires to expose evil in the industry and in the corridors of the elites who rule this world, not just the ‘industry.’

Continue reading “The Truth About the (Music) ‘Industry’ Expounded in The Prodigal Band Trilogy (Part Five)—If Dead Rock Stars Could Talk (Part One)”

The Truth About the (Music) ‘Industry’ Expounded in The Prodigal Band Trilogy (Part Four)—Mind Control

Sorry for the delay in posting! This continues the posts from The Prodigal Band Trilogy regarding how the music industry operates. The mind control I refer to here is not MK-Ultra type or magic-trance type operations, but spiritual, using crystals and rituals combined with ‘prayers’ to spiritual entities; in most cases, evil ones.

However, the first snippet post is part of a song given by good spiritual entities (the angels called the Tooters) to an early 80s rock band singer, Cobey McLeod, that would later serve as an example to the prodigal band, Sound Unltd. The song is called “The Legend of the Prophesied Band,” has a ‘surf music staccato,’ and is featured in Chapter One of The Prophesied Band. This snippet contains part of a verse of the song the ‘prophesies’ the band in question partaking in evil, which it would of course:

Then, the surfer-riffs clashed with metallic onslaught. McLeod’s voice spoke of deals made with the ungodly and lives of pleasure wasted.

And they will dance with Satan,

And they will be filled with lust.

Their minds won’t be their own.

They’ll be the tools of the unjust.

But, like the Prodigal Son, they will come home to live in the ways of The Creator. And the young will follow them.

I emphasize here the final two lines, “Their minds won’t be their own, they’ll be the tools of the unjust,” the evil satanic character Corion and his minions.

Continue reading “The Truth About the (Music) ‘Industry’ Expounded in The Prodigal Band Trilogy (Part Four)—Mind Control”

The Truth About the (Music) ‘Industry’ Expounded in The Prodigal Band Trilogy (Part Three)—Handlers and Agendas

It isn’t just a matter of “selling one’s soul” for fame and fortune that explains why so many entertainers appear to promote and practice debauched behavior on- and off-stage. Those guiding their careers and success surely have something to do with it, including managers, producers, backers, and such ‘influencers’ as pop culture sages and spirit-guides. Timothy Leary and new age leader Maharishi Mahesh Yogi are examples from the ‘hippie days’ of the sixties, and Aliester Crowley, a Satanist and leader of an occultist group Thelema who died in 1947 (and memorialized by the Beatles as ‘sergeant pepper’ of sorts…Crowley also appeared on that album’s cover) also was an influencer in the 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s; Jimmy Page of Led Zeppelin fame was an avowed follower of Crowley.

Thus it is not just ‘whistling Dixie’ that I included among the evil characters for The Prodigal Band Trilogy the occult ‘church’ leader Swami Negran, his successor, ‘healer’ Cole Blessing, and then the next successor Mark Besst, a tech oligarch in the age of the internet. Also included in the bad guy list are evil ‘Novordo Club’ and occult secret society the Hellyons members Baron Torquay-Lambourgeau, Duke Marty Effingchester, Mrs. X and Y and Rodney Davis, a mafioso-type, and others. All of these can be considered handlers, making sure the prodigal band Sound Unltd follows the nihilist agenda set forth by the evil, led by the Satan-character, Corion, who guides those handlers.

Continue reading “The Truth About the (Music) ‘Industry’ Expounded in The Prodigal Band Trilogy (Part Three)—Handlers and Agendas”

The Truth About the (Music) ‘Industry’ Expounded in The Prodigal Band Trilogy (Part Two)

Years ago I read several articles in various newspapers and pop culture magazines about Mafia or ‘Syndicate’ influence in the music industry (as with Hollywood and other entertainment platforms) into the 80s and 90s. I know for a fact that the Mafias (and I don’t just mean the Sicilian one) owned various night clubs and concert venues (and not just in the US).Though Mafia influence seems to have waned some I suspect they still have a say in the entertainment businesses, including record labels.

Note: the part about involvement with evil New Age guru Swami Negran, as stated in the previous post, will appear next week in Part Three.

The following snippet is from Chapter Two of the original version of The Prodigal Band, self-published by OmegaBooks in 2018, © Deborah Lagarde. The then-five band members (minus bassist Keith who would rejoin the band later) are sitting with then-manager Billy Prestin, Keith’s dad Sean Mullock and new road manager Billy Hallsip, eating spaghetti, the night before the band Sound Unltd would embark on their contest-winning national tour.

Continue reading “The Truth About the (Music) ‘Industry’ Expounded in The Prodigal Band Trilogy (Part Two)”

The Truth About the (Music) ‘Industry’ Expounded in The Prodigal Band Trilogy (Part One)—And a Tribute to Rap Legend DMX…RIP, DMX!

I was going to post a new set of articles regarding either The Prodigal Band Trilogy or a message for Christian authors in their writings. But then I learned rapper DMX, an avowed believer on Christ, died supposedly of a heart attack on April 2, which so happened to be Good Friday, the day Jesus Christ was crucified on the cross in the year (according to most historians) 29 AD.

While I was never a fan of rap, gangsta or otherwise, I was a fan (sort of) of DMX as he was an avowed believer on Christ and is known to have spoken about Christ to fans and rap fans in general. While I was not a listener to his tracks, I did hear him in various videos talking about ‘the industry,’ such as one on YouTube that was later incorporated into a ‘truther’ video upon his passing, such as this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7c0Z6P82hI (copy and paste the link into the browser; due to the ridiculous CASE Act, I will not post the video which might be copyrighted.) He not only denounced the evil within ‘the industry’ but also ‘preached’ so to speak about accepting Christ as Savior to fans at concerts and other events. Further, DMX was an actual inspiration while completing the trilogy in 2018.

Continue reading “The Truth About the (Music) ‘Industry’ Expounded in The Prodigal Band Trilogy (Part One)—And a Tribute to Rap Legend DMX…RIP, DMX!”