Symbolism Within The Prodigal Band Trilogy, Part Three

The most important symbols within The Prodigal Band Trilogy—star systems and constellations symbolizing the battle between good and evil, the Red Crystal of Corion and the Corion Cross—have already been discussed with appropriate trilogy snippets in the previous two posts. This post concerns symbols that the prodigal band uses on album covers and as stage props in concerts that are prevalent within the pop music industry now and for decades. Satanic symbols and patterns, checkered-mosaic-tiled-floors (a Freemasonic highlight, supposedly), drippings from chains suspended between legs (indicating drippings from orgasms), pentagrams and “oozing” vaginas are used on one particular album cover. For concerts, A-shaped or triangular ‘monoliths’ (indicating so-called ‘illuminati’ symbolism) topped with rotating circular shapes such as ‘planet Earth’ and eye-shaped symbols (‘the all-seeing-eye’-like symbols), and, of course, the Corion Cross of which the prodigal band’s logo is based upon.

Album covers for rock bands utilizing ‘satanic’ symbols have been around for years and most prominent rock bands from the 60s into today have used these symbols. One symbol I did not use that is extremely prominent then and now—the ‘one-eye sign’—was not used because I never saw that symbol as significant until the site Vigilant Citizen showed me just how this symbol is everywhere in pop culture. But this symbol was even used back in the days of the Beatles; more than one album cover has a variation of the one-eye sign, including one of their earliest albums. Commonly known ‘satanic’ symbols would include upside-down crosses, symbols of pagan gods such as the ‘eye of Horus’ or Baphomet horns (used, to my dismay, by a loved-one’s fave Japanese rock band, the GazettE, on a poster of theirs) or the ‘as above so below’ arms pointing upward and downward simultaneously used by many rockers in posters and such, ‘666’ and such pointed symbols or upside-down 5-pointed stars, and other pagan god symbols too numerous to mention.

So, I figured, if this prodigal band began its journey to redemption as a tool for the forces of evil, at least one album cover and at least one concert featuring these symbols had to be utilized within the trilogy. Since the first novel in the trilogy, Battle of the Band, is the only novel that mentions an album cover in detail or a concert in detail, all three snippets in this post come from this novel.

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